Fly Fishing the Maitland River

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I can still remember the excitement rising up alongside the morning sun as I pedaled my homemade bicycle, affectionately nicknamed “the swampcycle”, over the loose gravel concession road to where it ended at the Maitland River for a morning fish. In the last couple of decades I’ve been blessed enough to have found many rivers throughout Ontario that have captured a piece of my heart, but the Maitland will always be weighted with significance. The Maitland River was my introduction to river fishing; a bi-weekly escape for a city boy longing to be a country boy. The Maitland River is a large & complex meandering river that changes faces a number of times throughout its entirety. From the almost stagnant

Fly fishing the Bayfield River

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This is one of southern Ontario’s finest steelhead streams.  It is relatively small, and rather inviting to just about any angler who enjoys a wilderness getaway in the heart of southern Ontario.  Located on Ontario’s “West Coast,” The Bayfield River is a small to medium sized river. It flows from just south of the town of Seaforth, then through Vanastra and Clinton before emptying into Lake Huron at the town of, you guessed it, Bayfield. Migratory and Resident Fish Populations The Bayfield River receives a healthy run of migratory Rainbow Trout in the spring and fall, with the majority of them being wild. In the fall, look for Chinook Salmon and Coho Salmon as well. Summer time can provide the

Fly Fishing The Beaver River

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Information for fly fishing the Beaver River in Southern Ontario. Mainly looked at as a cold water stream, the Beaver river and its pristine tributaries are host to several species of trout and salmon as well as bass and other warm water species in the lower sections. The Beaver River in southern Ontario flows from the Niagara Escarpment and empties into Nottawasaga Bay, an inlet of Georgian Bay, at the town of Thornbury, Ontario. A fish ladder near Thornbury allows migratory fish such as trout and salmon species to reach spawning areas up river. Flowing through The Beaver Valley, which is a deep wedge on the western side of the Niagara escarpment, formed by a much larger ancestor of this